Recommitment

imageSome people believe in the ‘age of accountability.’ Essentially, this means that, until a certain age (most say twelve or thirteen), children are not accountable for their actions as they are not old enough to choose Jesus Christ as their Lord and Savior.

This way, infants – especially those who died before birth due to miscarriage or abortion – would be able to get to heaven despite the fact that they never became Christians in the traditional sense of believing in Jesus, etc.

However, this idea doesn’t really make sense to me. I want it to be true … but children choose to be the little brats they are (’cause I know I did! Do, actually … I’m not past being a little brat … only now I’m a big brat … and pretty soon I’ll be adult brat … it’s really not cool!) it’s not mentioned in the Bible. It says in Psalm 51:5 –

“Behold, I was brought forth in iniquity, and in sin did my mother conceive me.”

Obviously from this verse (which can be taken literally … I think all the Psalms can, actually. *holds opinion stubbornly*), we’re sinners from the moment of conception … how can babies get into heaven unless they’re washed by God’s blood? And unless they believe (and I think we’ll all agree that babies can’t really choose God), how can we receive God’s gift of grace?

It’s very confusing, and I’ve yet to have anyone give me a straightforward answer to it. I only believe in God’s incredible grace and mercy and know that He wouldn’t let a little baby go to hell.

bible-1806079_960_720However, regardless of the existence of the ‘age of accountability’ or not, you’ll notice that growing up in Christian homes can breed a sort of a ‘I’m good’ attitude.

You know what I mean (whether this applies to you personally or not). Ever since you were four you’ve been a Christian. You’ve gone to church all your life. All your family and friends are Christian. You’re surrounded by light. You’re good.

Well, we know that’s not true. Growing up in a Christian family doesn’t make you a Christian any more than going to church does! Sure, it helps (sometimes … unless you’re rebellious … like me) … but it doesn’t automatically write you in God’s book of good little children. (I know y’all know this … but it needs stated again and again!)

And then there’s that commitment to God you made when you were four. I’m not saying it’s no longer legitimate … but, well, you’re growing up, and, if you were honest, could you say you really own it?

When you were four, life was so simple, remember? Sleep, eat, play, eat, play, eat, sleep in that order. except on Christmas morning when it was more like “wake up at three, try to sleep, wake up at three ten, try to sleep, wake up at three fifteen …” etc. And Jesus was just a fact you accepted.

But sometimes it’s good to question things. It leads to answers, and if you look hard enough, you’ll always find ones that prove time and again that God’s really alive and He’s really the good Father everyone says He is.

There comes a time in every girl who was raised in a Christian family when the faith that your mother and father believe in needs to become the faith you believe in, in a bigger way than you did when you were four. unless you’re Elsie Dinsmore. Hey, that rhymed!

For me, I think I was pretty much in the ‘I’m good’ attitude until a couple years back when I started making Christianity my own. I even got re-baptized. It wasn’t something that happened all of the sudden, of course. It happened slowly, over a period of several years, and I’m still a baby in Christ, but … well, I’m working on it. It’s a slow process, all right?! What? Only for me. Hmm …

So, do you need to recommit to God?

Are you relying on your parents’ faith to save you? Are you just going through the motions or are you seriously involved in worship, in serving your Lord? At your church? At home? At school? Everywhere? Do you really have a personal relationship with God, a relationship all your own that no one can take away from you?

Everyone learns a different way, but here are some things that I’ve done to [try to] form a more personal relationship with God (although … yeah … I’ve yet to find out if they actually work … so bear with me! 😉 ).

prayer-888757_960_720

  1. Pray. Always #1! Prayer is so important! Trust me; your prayers are always answered. Sometimes the answer isn’t one you want (“no” or “wait” aren’t always the best words to hear!) … but then, quite honestly, what you want isn’t really the priority … it’s what you need. Recently I started keeping a ‘prayer journal.’ I don’t write my prayers in it (that would take waaay too long), but I write certain prayer requests, lists of people I want to pray for, bits of my thoughts, and a list of ‘praises’ (because it’s important to look at the positive side of praying, too! It can get depressing sometimes! :/ ).bible-1136784_960_720
  2. Read God’s word. Reading the Bible is probably #2. Make sure you get some in every day! I try to do a chapter every evening. Some people are more dedicated (I’m reading a short story – or would be in I didn’t keep getting distracted by NaNoWriMo – in which a girl is trying to read 20 chapters every day!), but a chapter every day is a good goal for me. I’m reading through Psalms right now. Although … I skip around a lot. Some days I’m like, “Ooh, Ruth looks good!” and other days I’m like, “Oh, John! I always liked John …” Yeah … well, at least I’m reading it … in random bits and pieces … 😛team-386673_960_720
  3. Spend time with other Christians. ‘Fellowshipping,’ in other words. So important. There are so many chapters in the book of Proverbs about choosing your friends wisely. I’m not saying don’t talk to non-Christians (do! How else can you share the truth?). I’m just saying you also need to spend a lot of time with fellow Christians. And I don’t mean at a Bible study (although you could do that, too, I suppose) or anything like that. Just hanging out – watching a movie, chatting about boys (if you’re *cough cough* so inclined … I’m not, usually) or your latest novel (if you’re me) or … singing Taylor Swift songs drastically out of key. You know, whatever you do with your friends. We, personally (if you can use that word to describe more than one person), dive into creeks in freezing cold weather or play violent games on trampolines. Christians, with Jesus’ awesomeness shining through them, are the lights of world. You need to be around that light to nurture your own.fantasy-181304_960_720
  4. Study historical and scientific proof of Christianity/Creationism. I don’t know how anyone could see the strong evidence that evolution is impossible and that events of the Bible actually happened (miraculously so!) and ignore it. It’s absolutely unbelievable how pig-headed people are! XD Really, though, do it! Besides, you can tell your mom (if you’re homeschooled) that it’s for school. And you’ll be smart. And a better Christian. And math isn’t really necessary. You can ditch math. It’ll work. Trust me. Riiiiiiight.

Well, that’s all I have to say today. That may not have been a very impressive post, but I tried my best.

Until December (when you’ll have to put up with me again),

stars

Advertisements

15 thoughts on “Recommitment

  1. You know, I think the reason people think children aren’t responsible for their actions is because they are watching us and doing what we are doing. Yeah, they might know that something is “naughty,” but I really don’t think they fully understand it. To them, it is whatever they feel like doing. But yeah, I get what you are saying. but I can’t believe that a merciful and just God would throw a 6-year-old out of heaven. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yep, it doesn’t make sense that God would throw a six-year-old out of heaven. Yet … I don’t know. I guess God knows what He’s doing, though, and probably has a system all worked out even if we don’t understand it yet. Although I do believe that kids are responsible for their actions at a pretty young age on … they have a sin nature and the ability to choose differently, too.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yeah, I get that. But I think kids tend to look up to us a lot. They are going to do what we do. A lot of times justify it because “she did it!” But yes, they should be punished and taught to do right. a lot more kids need spankings these days. Don’t call me harsh, spareth the rod, spoilith the child. But what if they aren’t taught what is right? How are they supposed to know?

        Liked by 1 person

      • I totally agree. A spanked child is a happy child. 🙂 I believe that all of us are born with a inherent sense of right and wrong just as we are born with a sin nature. But teaching a child right and wrong is, of course, an important part of the family-education.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Reblogged this on Reveries and commented:

    I know, I know … no posts on the weekend. But that’s my rule, not your rule, so what do you care?! Seriously, though, folks, this is another post I wrote on Send the Light. I hope you enjoy, like, comment on, and share it. 🙂

    Like

  3. Great post Kellyn! I understand you exactly. When I was younger I believed in CHrist and it was simple. As I’ve gotten older I’ve really made that faith my own. I still struggle (especially with the whole I’m a good person thing. I actually wrote a whole post about it!) but I know that God is always there for me. your tips were really good. I loved this post!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. After reading this post, I decided to do a little bit of research to see what I really knew about my church’s belief on the age of accountability, and I found this really good talk on it, if you want to read it, which explains what we believe: https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1994/04/the-special-status-of-children?lang=eng&_r=1

    Anyway, I definitely love the idea of recommitting to God! There are so many things that I can change and get better at and I love that God will help me. Thanks for posting! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s